Category Archives: Tutorials

Here I’ll show you how to do cool stuff.

Creating a RESTful API with Silex using Composer and PHPUnit

Recently I’ve been playing around with Silex largely due to wanting to experiment with the various frameworks out there but also because I wanted to have a play around with composer. Previously I’ve used either Zend Framework or Kohana for my projects and whilst they don’t prevent you from using composer, they weren’t built with it in mind. For dependancy injection I’ve been using Sensio Labs’ Pimple – which I find to be awesome. Soon, I want to look at Symfony2 so I figured playing around with Silex (also by Sensio Labs) would be a great per-cursor; it uses all the same mod-cons and introduces the Symfony framework gradually.

So, where do we begin? Well I want to code from my MacBook to begin with – write some code and some tests. If I get that far, we can look at using My dev server to run Apache!

I’m assuming you’ve got a fresh install of Mountain Lion – so open up the terminal and smash in the following command:

sudo php /usr/lib/php/install-pear-nozlib.phar

Now, edit your php.ini and add the following:

zend_extension=/usr/lib/php/extensions/no-debug-non-zts-20090626/xdebug.so
include_path=.:/usr/lib/php/pear
memory_limit=512M
date.timezone=UTC
detect_unicode = Off

Hey presto, you now have PHP setup on your Mac. Does it work?

$ php -v

All ok? Good. Now lets install composer; the following is a good guide:

http://getcomposer.org/download/

…or just run this in your terminal to get the latest Composer version:

$ curl -s https://getcomposer.org/installer | php
$ sudo mv composer.phar /usr/local/bin/composer

Go to your working directory (/code/projectname), create composer.json and add the following:

{
    "minimum-stability": "dev",
    "require": {
        "silex/silex": "1.0.*@dev"
    },
    "autoload": {
        "psr-0": {"DVO": "src/"}
    },
    "require-dev": {
        "phpunit/phpunit": "3.7.*",
        "squizlabs/php_codesniffer": "1.*"
    }
}

Here we are specifying that phpunit and Codesniffer should only be installed hen the –dev flag is specified. So let’s go ahead and do just that:

$ composer install --dev

First things first you will notice we now have a vendor folder – this is where composer puts all our external libraries. If you want to add this project to a Git repository, make sure you add the vendor folder to the .gitignore file. You can see below I’ve added a few other items too.

.gitignore:

*.lock
vendor/
build/
.DS_Store

Okay, let’s create our directory structure:

/code
    /projectname
        /app
        /src
        /vendor
        /web

Open up web/index.php with the following:

<?php

use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Request;

$app = require_once __DIR__.'/../app/app.php';

if (count($argv) > 0) {
    list($_, $method, $path) = $argv;
    $request = Request::create($path, $method);
    $app->run($request);    
} else {
    $app->run();    
}

This allows us to run our code via the CLI – we don’t want to have to get Apache involved just yet.

Now create app.php and bootstrap.php and put these in the app directory.

app/app.php:

<?php

require_once __DIR__.'/bootstrap.php';

use Silex\Application;
use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Request;
use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Response;

$app = new Application();
$app['debug'] = true;

// example route - kinda obvious what this does :)
$app->get('/hello/{name}', function ($name) use ($app) {
    return 'Hello '.$app->escape($name);
});

return $app;

bootstrap.php:

<?php

require_once __DIR__.'/../vendor/autoload.php';

Done! You can now go to your console and type the following command:

$ php web/index.php GET /hello/yourname

That’s all we need to call Silex, but as you can see it doesn’t do a great deal. To sort out our API and pull back some data we will now call some of our own library code. In here we will have the controllers and entities. The controllers are to handle our CRUD requests and the Entity stuff is where I’ve used a Factory and Gateway to access the data.

src/DVO/Controller/VoucherController.php:

<?php

namespace DVO\Controller;

use DVO\Entity\Voucher;
use DVO\Entity\Voucher\VoucherFactory;
use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\JsonResponse;

class VoucherController
{
    protected $_factory;

    /**
     * VoucherController constructor
     *
     * @param VoucherFactory $factory The voucher factory
     * 
     * @return void
     * @author
     **/
    public function __construct(VoucherFactory $factory)
    {
        $this->_factory = $factory;
    }

    public function indexJsonAction()
    {
        $vouchers = $this->_factory->getVouchers();
        $vouchers = array_map(function($voucher) {
            $vc = array();
            $vc['code'] = $voucher->getCode();

            return $vc;
        }, $vouchers);
        return new JsonResponse($vouchers);
    }

    public function createJsonAction()
    {
    }

    public function updateJsonAction()
    {
    }

    public function deleteJsonAction()
    {
    }
}

src/DVO/Entity/Voucher/VoucherFactory.php:

<?php

namespace DVO\Entity\Voucher;

use DVO\Cache;


class VoucherFactory
{
    protected $_gateway;
    protected $_cache;

    /**
     * VoucherFactory constructor
     *
     * @param VoucherGateway $gateway The voucher gateway
     * @param Cache          $cache   The cache
     * 
     * @return void
     * @author
     **/
    public function __construct(VoucherGateway $gateway, Cache $cache)
    {   
        $this->_gateway = $gateway;
        $this->_cache   = $cache;
    }

    /**
     * Creates the Voucher
     *
     * @return void
     * @author 
     **/
    public static function create()
    {
        return new \DVO\Entity\Voucher;
    }

    /**
     * Gets the vouchers
     *
     * @return void
     * @author 
     **/
    public function getVouchers()
    {
        $vouchers = array_map(function($voucher) {
            $vc = VoucherFactory::create();
            foreach ($voucher as $key => $value) {
                $vc->$key = $value;
            }

            return $vc;
        }, $this->_gateway->getAllVouchers());

        return $vouchers;
    }
}

src/DVO/Entity/Voucher/VoucherGateway.php:

<?php

namespace DVO\Entity\Voucher;

class VoucherGateway
{   
    /**
     * Get vouchers
     *
     * @return void
     * @author 
     **/
    public function getAllVouchers()
    {
        return array(array('code' => 'OFFER999'));
    }
}

src/DVO/Entity/Voucher.php:

<?php

namespace DVO\Entity;

/**
 * Voucher
 *
 * @package default
 * @author 
 **/
class Voucher extends EntityAbstract
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->_data = array(
            'id'   => '',
            'code' => ''
            );
    }
}

src/DVO/Entity/EntityAbstract.php:

<?php

namespace DVO\Entity;

/**
 * Abstract Entity
 *
 * @package default
 * @author 
 **/
abstract class EntityAbstract
{
    protected $_data;
    /**
     * Magic function to capture getters & setters
     *
     * @param string $name      the name of the function
     * @param array  $arguments an array of arguments
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function __call($name, array $arguments)
    {
        $type     = substr($name, 0, 3);
        $variable = strtolower(substr($name, 3));
        switch ($type) {
            case 'get':
                return $this->$variable;
            break;
            case 'set':
                $this->$variable = $arguments[0];
            break;
            default:
                return $this->invalid($type);
            break;
        }
    }

    public function getData()
    {
        return $this->_data;
    }

    /**
     * Magic function to capture getters
     *
     * @param string $name name of the variable
     *
     * @return mixed
     */
    public function __get($name)
    {   
        if (true === array_key_exists($name, $this->_data)) {
            return $this->_data[$name];
        } else {
            throw new Exception('Param ' . $name . ' not found in ' . get_called_class());
        }
    }

    /**
     * Magic function to capture setters
     *
     * @param string $name  the name of the var
     * @param string $value the value for the var
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function __set($name, $value)
    {
        if (true === array_key_exists($name, $this->_data)) {
            $this->_data[$name] = $value;
        } else {
            throw new Exception('Param ' . $name . ' not found in ' . get_called_class());
        }
    }

    /**
     * called when invalid function is called
     *
     * @return boolean
     **/
    public function invalid($type)
    {
        throw new Exception('Error: Invalid handler in ' . get_called_class());
    }
}

src/DVO/Entity/Exception.php:

<?php

namespace DVO\Entity;

class Exception extends \Exception
{

}

src/DVO/Cache.php:

<?php

namespace DVO;

/**
 * Cache Class
 *
 * @package Cache Class
 * @author 
 **/
class Cache
{
}

Now we’ve added those lovely additional files, you can modify app/app.php:

<?php

require_once __DIR__.'/bootstrap.php';

use Silex\Application;
use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Request;
use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Response;

$app = new Application();
$app['debug'] = true;

// example route - kinda obvious what this does :)
$app->get('/hello/{name}', function ($name) use ($app) {
    return 'Hello '.$app->escape($name);
});

// setup the app cache
$app['cache'] = $app->share(function(){
    return new DVO\Cache;
});

// setup the voucher gateway
$app['vouchers.gateway'] = $app->share(function() {
    return new DVO\Entity\Voucher\VoucherGateway;
});

// setup the voucher factory
$app['vouchers.factory'] = $app->share(function() use($app) {
    return new DVO\Entity\Voucher\VoucherFactory($app['vouchers.gateway'], $app['cache']);
});

// setup the voucher controller
$app['vouchers.controller'] = $app->share(function() use ($app) {
    return new DVO\Controller\VoucherController($app['vouchers.factory']);
});

$app->register(new Silex\Provider\ServiceControllerServiceProvider());

$app->get('/vouchers', "vouchers.controller:indexJsonAction");
$app->post('/vouchers', "vouchers.controller:createJsonAction");
$app->put('/vouchers', "vouchers.controller:updateJsonAction");
$app->delete('/vouchers', "vouchers.controller:deleteJsonAction");

return $app;

Give it a whirl:

$ php web/index.php GET /vouchers

I’m not going to go into explaining about Gateway and Factory design patterns but I’m sure the code above is in a very simple enough form for you to understand. Some folks absoutely hate magic methods – but don’t forget that the EntityAbstract class is just what is says it is, an Abstract class. If a particular entity requires it’s own getter then go ahead and create it.

If you’ve gotten this far and it’s working then you’ve done well – good work! The next step is to use PHPUnit to test all of our beautiful code. For this we can setup PHPUnit.

Copy the below and put it in app/phpunit.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<phpunit backupGlobals="false"
         backupStaticAttributes="false"
         colors="true"
         convertErrorsToExceptions="true"
         convertNoticesToExceptions="true"
         convertWarningsToExceptions="true"
         processIsolation="false"
         stopOnFailure="false"
         syntaxCheck="false"
         bootstrap="bootstrap.php">
    <testsuites>
        <testsuite name="YourApp Test Suite">
            <directory>../tests/</directory>
        </testsuite>
    </testsuites>

    <logging>
        <log type="coverage-html" target="../build/coverage" title="PHP_CodeCoverage"
        charset="UTF-8" yui="true" highlight="true"
        lowUpperBound="35" highLowerBound="70"/>
        <log type="coverage-clover" target="../build/logs/clover.xml"/>
        <log type="junit" target="../build/logs/junit.xml" logIncompleteSkipped="false"/>
    </logging>

    <filter>
        <whitelist addUncoveredFilesFromWhitelist="true">
        <directory suffix=".php">../src</directory>
        <exclude>
            <file>../src/DVO/Entity/Voucher/VoucherGateway.php</file>
        </exclude>
        </whitelist>
    </filter>

    <php>
        <server name="APP_DIR" value="/code/projectname/app" />
        <env name="env" value="test" />
    </php>
</phpunit>

I’ve set the phpunit.xml file to dump the code coverage logs to the build directory. It’s good to set up a vhost to point to this folder so you can view your code coverage.

Here, I’m just doing a very basic test just to show you how you can get one running.

tests/DVO/CacheTest.php:

<?php

/**
 * Cache Test
 *
 * @package DVO
 * @author 
 **/
class CacheTest extends \PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    /**
     * Cache is just an empty class atm!
     *
     * @return void
     * @author 
     **/
    public function testCache() {
        $cache = new \DVO\Cache;
        $this->assertInstanceOf('\DVO\Cache', $cache);
    }
}

Run the tests:

$ ./vendor/bin/phpunit -c app/phpunit.xml

I’ve not put all the tests in the tutorial – but you can find them in the repo on GitHub (https://github.com/posmena/voucherapi) – feel free to follow Posmena on GitHub!

So, you’ve used the above code and your tests pass? Maybe now you want to make sure you code is PSR2 compliant – a very popular coding standard. We already installed Codesniffer via composer earlier, so all you need to do to check your code against code sniffer:

$ ./vendor/bin/phpcs --config-set default_standard PSR2
$ ./vendor/bin/phpcs src

There’s a very good chance (certainty) that the above code will not pass PSR2 standards. I figured I’d leave a few little things for you to research. I won’t be too cruel though; PHP Closures don’t seem to be PSR2 compliant so you need to wrap them with the @codingStandardsIgnoreStart and @codingStandardsIgnoreEnd tags. Once your code is passing Codesniffer, you will simply not get any errors. Checkout the CodeSniffer options page for config options.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this article. I’m open to any comments/suggestions you may have!

Bobby (@bobbyjason)

Thanks to:

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Building a Data Feed Driven Website (with @WebgainsUK Feeds)

Part 1: Webgains Data feed Introduction

Where I work (@WebgainsUK), we often have a lot of affiliates contact us that want help with regard to data feeds. Whilst a lot of these queries tend to be technical questions relating to an issue with the feed, or reporting a problem with a merchant’s feed; some of these requests are as technical as asking how to build a site using the data feeds, how to import feeds into the database, or asking how to build a price comparison site. Sadly, as much as Webgains try to help with these sorts of questions wherever possible, it’s simply not possible to offer the in-depth time-consuming answer required due to the nature of the task in hand.

Thankfully, there are tools out there such as Easy Content Units, which allows affiliates to insert content units into their site without requiring any knowledge of data feeds. A plus point of being a Webgains affiliate is that Webgains is partnered with Easy Content Units and as such get the service for free. However, having 3×3, 4×4 or other size grids of products powered by someone else’s website isn’t always what an affiliate wants – some folks want to do their own thing, and know how it works. Also, having products powered by Easy Content Units doesn’t do much for your SEO; you can’t index each individual product, you can’t have an in-built search, you can’t categorise your products, and you’re also relying on their server be up 100% of the time. Throw in a few other excuses for not wanting to use it, and you have a compelling reason why affiliates are asking how to build their own data driven website.

So with that in mind, I figured I’d have a go at providing a solution in the format of a guide, “Building a Data Feed Driven Website”. This guide will come in several parts, I have no idea how many parts it will be, and I have no idea if I will ever finish it. First things first though, let’s set out the objective.

Objective

To build a website that:
> is able to download data feeds from Webgains on a regular basis, so that the prices are always correct.
> can display 1 product per page for SEO reasons.
> has SEO friendly URLs
> can categorise products.
> has a neat search facility.
> has a voucher facility to accompany the products.
> can list the latest offers and promotions from merchants.

For now, that can be the ‘simplistic’ objective – we can always add to it later if we desire. Notice how the requirement mentions ‘data feeds from Webgains’; the reason for this is that as a Webgains employee, I feel I have a duty to not help you promote other networks. If by reading my guide, you feel technically inclined to mash the code to allow you to download feeds from other networks then feel free, but don’t ask me how 🙂

Tools/Resources/Knowledge Required

Basic understanding of affiliate marketing is a given; you should know what products you want to promote, you should know what a data feed is, you should know why you are reading this, and you should know what it is you want to achieve. It’s probably worth noting that you won’t get very far without a Webgains affiliate account. Signup to Webgains here.

Ultimately, you are going to need access to a server capable of running PHP5 & MySQL5. In terms of getting a server up and running with PHP5 and MySQL5, I’m afraid it is beyond the realm of this guide. However, if you have a spare computer laying around; may I suggest that you install Ubuntu. If you need help with that, Google this: “ubuntu LAMP server”. Failing that, you could always try a webhost like Fasthosts.

In addtion, you will need a decent text editor (Notepad++, or EditPlus[I use this]) and a willingness to learn. As this guide is meant to be a resource to those who already have a basic understanding of PHP & MySQL, you will have to ‘catch up’ where necessary. If possible, I’ll try to give, ‘beginners guide tips’ – but the ultimate goal is for you to reach the objective, so maybe a twitter account will be required so you can ask me questions: @bobbyjason.

Notes

Due to the nature of complexities of this project (it’s not such a small project after all), I’m going to code the site in sections of how to do each bit. I can’t promise that the final project will involve all the final bits being put together, as each section is meant to be a mini-guide in it’s own right. Again, throw any questions my way: @bobbyjason.

Getting Started

The most obvious place to start, is at the heart of the problem; data feeds. If you knew how to work with data feeds, and you knew how to load them into a database – you probably wouldn’t be reading this guide, so it is for that reason I have decided to start here. For the sake of brevity, I’m not going to explain in detail the difference between downloading a datafeed directly, and downloading a feed via a URL. In short, for our objective we want to download the feed via a URL as this will allow our website to be automated.

So, head over to the “Data feed url generator” and select the “xml” option, rather than “csv”. XML is a much more structured approach, and it makes life much easier where trying to find a problem when things go wrong – plus, I prefer working with XML and its MY guide! Select the “.gz” option – this is the only option that allows you to download a compressed feed immediatly. “.zip”, and “.tar.gz” required you to hang around a little – not so good. Select ONE of the programs, not all – but ONE. You can then select ‘All’ at the categories option, and select the ‘exended’ fields option. Finally, enter your username and password, and grab the URL – you should something that looks similar to this:

http://content.webgains.com/affiliates/datafeed.html?action=download&campaign=12345&username=username@website.com&password=password&format=xml&zipformat=gzip_notar&fields=extended&programs=1234&categories=all

If you have a URL like the one above (with the correct username and password), you should be able paste it into your browser and download a .gz compressed feed of the program you selected. Notice how you can replace the “programs” parameter with any other program ID to download a feed for a different program. Straight away you should be able to see the logic required here; we need to create a PHP script that can loop through each of the programs’ feeds that we wish to download, and enter the correct program ID. In psuedo form, here it is:

foreach program
….download feed for this program
end foreach

Of course, in reality we don’t want to just download the feed, we also want to take the data out of it and populate our database, but I figured baby steps would be best as not every one will understand that just yet. So let’s get sizzling. Glancing at the clock I can see that it is 18/10/2010 22:17 – this means that I am missing the last episode of The Inbetweeners which is rather upsetting. Thankfully we have 4OD in this modern world, so I’ll create this script and then head off to bed!

<?php /* lesson1.php */

error_reporting(E_ALL|E_STRICT);
ini_set('display_errors', true);

// Create an array of the programs that we want to download
$programs = array(4084, 116);

print "Starting...\n";

// PHP foreach loop.
foreach ($programs as $program_id)
{
 // Use the "sprintf" function to pass the correct values to the string.
 // Also, splitting up the string to avoid long lines of code.
 $feed_url = sprintf('http://content.webgains.com/affiliates/datafeed.html?'.
 'action=download&campaign=%s&username=%s&password=%s'.
 '&format=xml&zipformat=gzip_notar&fields=extended'.
 '&programs=%d&categories=all',
12345, 'USERNAME', 'PASSWORD',$program_id);

 // Set the path of where you would like to save the file.
 $file = '/home/chops/xml/guide/feeds/'.$program_id.'.xml';
 $compressed = $file.'.gz';

 // Download the file (requires function, 'curl_get_file_contents'
 $data = curl_get_file_contents($feed_url);

 // Open the file for writing, write, and close the file.
 $fp = fopen($compressed, 'w+');
 fwrite($fp, $data);
 fclose($fp);

 // Call the a UNIX command to unzip the file, and move it to our desired location.
 shell_exec("gunzip -c $compressed > $file");

}

print "Done.\n";

// Function to download a file.
function curl_get_file_contents($url)
{
 // Output something so we know it's working.
 print "Downloading '".$url."'\n";
 flush();

 $c = curl_init();
 curl_setopt($c, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);
 curl_setopt($c, CURLOPT_URL, $url);
 curl_setopt($c, CURLOPT_CONNECTTIMEOUT, 5000);
 curl_setopt($c, CURLOPT_TIMEOUT, 10000);
 $contents = curl_exec($c);
 curl_close($c);

 return $contents;
}
?>

You can copy that code into a text document, save it as ‘lesson1.php’ (be sure to replace username, password and campaignid with your values!). You can call the script directly in a browser if you wish, personally I shall use the terminal. The files will be downloaded to the specified location. Note: If there are any PHP Gurus out there, you will notice that this code may not be the most complex, but I’m trying to keep it simple for those that may not be so familiar with PHP.

All the script does is:
> loop through our selected programs.
> downloads the compressed feed.
> extracts the compressed file with the name of {program_id}.xml

For now that will have to do, because I want to publish this blog post and go to bed. I hope it’s useful to somebody!

Coming up: How to parse the XML files and insert the products into a database.
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Apple Box – Nexus One Dock

What better way to make a Nexus One dock than ro recycle?

After selling my iPhone, I still had the box. It seemed silly to bin the box so I used to help make a dock for my Nexus One!

The two boxes

The two boxes

Nexus Fitting

Nexus Fitting

Cut a hole for the power cable

Cut a hole for the power cable

Stick it down!

Stick it down!

Cable attached - notice the angle of the nexus box- excellent!

Cable attached - notice the angle of the nexus box- excellent!

Hack away at the iPhone box...

Hack away at the iPhone box...

Stick the nexus card to the inner iPhone sleeve

Stick the nexus card to the inner iPhone sleeve

Shoved it into the outer iPhone sleeve

Shoved it into the outer iPhone sleeve

Pop the Nexus One into the DOCK!

Pop the Nexus One into the DOCK!

Beautiful, just... beautiful. Sorry for the smudge marks..

Beautiful, just... beautiful. Sorry for the smudge marks..

I love it..!

I love it..!

So there you have it…

…if you have a spare iPhone case laying around now you know what to do with it. 🙂

Hope you love my craft skillz. as you can see; it’s probably better that I stick to my Affiliate Marketing & Programming – but I still refuse to pay shipping TWICE to have TWO Google Nexus Docks shipped to the UK !!

o_O
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In addition the lower metal rivets gives it a wise decision
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The Emerald Home Chandler coffee and utility Made of P2 particleboard and enjoyable think about purchasing this table in creating a sturdy looking coffee tables are clearly highlighted to worry about purchasing this coffee and

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Green Android Desk Stand

Well, in an earlier post – I showed you how to make a budget Nexus One Andrex Dock

I thought I’d get creative – so I had a look how to make play dough:

http://becomingdomestic.co.uk/2006/10/28/how-to-make-playdough-no-cook-recipe/

And then Proceeded:

Ingredients in the bowl...

Ingredients in the bowl...

We NEED green!

We NEED green!

Mix it up...

Mix it up...

Aaah, lovely loaf...

Aaah, lovely loaf...

Into shape...

Into shape...

Right now, the thing is in the oven.

Apparently you are not meant to put play doh in the oven. So it may just be a big PHAT PHAIL!

I’ll update once it’s out the oven!!

UPDATE: ITS OUT THE OVEN

It burnt...

It burnt...

android-stand-7

so yeah, damn good reason to stop being a tight ass and pay for the shipping from the US for the Google Nexus One Desktop Dock!!

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Nexus One Andrex Dock

So, 26th January I ordered my Nexus One from Google.com and had to pay the $29 dollars for shipping to the UK.. quite reasonable price to be honest!

However, on 27th January Google Announced the Desktop Dock was now available – this was rather frustrating as I had already placed my order – so if I want one I will have to pay the $29 shipping fee again. However, I want 2! You can’t buy 2 though….If I want to purchase 2 then I have to place 2 seperate orders, meaning I will have to pay shipping to the UK twice, again – I’ve already paid once!

So, I figured I would make my own. This one cost 50 pence – (around 1 dollar to you US folks!)

Toilet Roll

Toilet Roll

Wow, it looks like a big polo..

Wow, it looks like a big polo..

USB Cable

USB Cable

Cutting a Gap

Cutting a Gap

Placing the Cable

Placing the Cable

Flatten the toilet roll

Flatten the toilet roll

Nexus One in the Bog Roll

Nexus One in the Bog Roll

Nexus One in the Bog Roll from a different angle

Nexus One in the Bog Roll from a different angle

There you have it!

This is perfect; I can create as many as I want. If you wanted to get creative you could colour yours in paint; or maybe cover it with papier mache?

$1 per dock – admitedly it doesn’t have Bluetooth like the Google one; but it’s a lot cheaper!

I almost forgot… A photo with the headphone Jack in:

With Audio Jack

Sorry about the quality of the photos… my digital camera is rubbish – it’s okay though as I now have a great camera in the Nexus One 🙂

Hope you like it.

p.s. Yes, I know it shit; but that’s what do you expect from a bit of shit roll? =))

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